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Page 16

Borneo Bulletin, Tuesday 28 February 2017

SEOUL (MK Business News) - Lee

Jae-hyun, chairman of South Korean

retail conglomerate CJ Group, will

return to the helm next month

after four years of absence due

to imprisonment from criminal

wrongdoings.

Lee was pushed out of his

office after he was charged with

embezzlement, breach of trust, and

tax evasion in June 2013. He was

sentenced to serve 30 months in

prison and fined 25.2 billion won

($22 million) in December 2015. His

prison term was cut short through

a presidential pardon in August last

year.

Since then, he has been under

hospital treatment for hereditary

disease. He recently has been

overseeing

management

affairs

from his hospital room.

The conglomerate that runs

an expansive line of food and

entertainment business in Korea

and overseas will decide on

appointments and organisation

reshuffle over the next week.

Its management agenda has been

stalled due to preoccupation with

the prosecution probe on suspected

favouritism in return for corporate

donations to President Park Geun-

hye and her friend Choi Soon-sil.

The prosecution suspects CJ would

have handed over funds to lobby for

early release for its chairman.

The group has operated under a

temporary management committee

with CJ Group Co-chairman Sohn

Kyung-shik, CJ Vice-Chairpersons

Lee Mi-kyung, Lee Chae-wook, and

Kim Chul-ha during Lee’s absence.

Lee is to re-register as the managing

director on the boards of CJ and CJ

Cheiljedang.

CJ Group Chairman Lee Jae-hyun

MK BUSINESS NEWS

CJ Group Chairman Lee Jae-

hyun to return to helm in March

UNDERHILL, Vermont (AP) — Maple syrup

doesn’t get that rich flavour and colour in

an instant. It’s a long process from tree to

bottle.

But an improved technology could keep

maple sugarers from working late into the

night boiling sap into syrup.

The new machine removes more water

from sap, leaving it with higher sugar

content. The concentrated sap takes half

the time to boil into syrup.

“For commercial maple producers,

time is money and energy is money. It

all comes down to how efficient you can

be to make syrup, and this is just the

next big step to save time,” said Timothy

Perkins, director of the University of

Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research

Center.

The centre produced its first batch of

syrup with a new machine last week. “It

definitely processed syrup very, very fast,”

Perkins said.

Most large maple operations already use

the traditional reverse osmosis systems that

have a membrane that separate water from

sugar. The new reverse osmosis technology

removes even more water.

Producing maple syrup is an old

New England cottage industry based on

tradition, so some maple sugarers are

wondering if faster is actually better. They

worry it could impact the quality.

“We’re questioning it,” said Eric Randall,

president of the North American Maple

Syrup Council. “We’re looking to see that

we’re doing the right thing.”

Perkins said the flavour of the syrup

produced with the new machine is so

far acceptable as the centre continues to

research the technology.

Parker Family Maple Farm, in West

Chazee, New York, expects a new machine

to arrive Wednesday that may double its

syrup production. “We’re anticipating

making 300 gallons of syrup an hour” with

the new machine, Michael Parker said.

Dozens of producers in Vermont,

New York, Maine and Wisconsin are now

using the machines, which are made by a

handful of companies. It’s an investment

of tens of thousands of dollars depending

on the size of the maple operation and

how much equipment is needed. Industry

officials say the cost is about 15 to 20 per

cent higher than the cost of the current

technology.

Parker said the time savings will be

welcome. “There’s only so many hours in a

day and we’re using all of them,” he said.

Technology saves maple syrup producers time, energy

AP

Eric Miller, US sales manager for Lapierre Equipment, checks a newly installed machine at the University of Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center in Underhill, Vermont